Money challenge

“Every once in a while you need to challenge yourself and learn new things.”

— Amit Ray

You’ve been reading this blog and have understood its lessons and taken action on them. You’ve done the below:

  • You’ve set financial goals.
  • You’ve repaid all your debt apart from your mortgage, if you have a mortgage that is.
  • You’ve reduced your expenses.
  • You’ve got 6 months’ worth of expenses saved up as an emergency fund.
  • You have life insurance and critical illness cover in place.
  • You’ve contributed as much as you can to your workplace pension.
  • You’ve contributed to a low cost index fund such as the S&P 500 from Vanguard via a stocks and shares ISA, in order to get all returns tax free.
  • You overpay your mortgage, if you have a mortgage.
  • Every three to six months you nudge up your contributions.
  • With the money remaining, you spend wisely and don’t blow it on £15 fish ‘n’ chips and a conservatory for the back of your house.

Now, you’re at a bit of a loss. What to do now? You’re in what they call “the long middle”. How do you keep hungry and focused once everything is set it place and ticking along? Well first of all, you’re luckier than the majority of the world. They don’t have the above in place.

Well, to keep you hungry, how about the money challenge? The money challenge is a way to set yourself small goals with your remaining spending money and keep focused.

Try these ten challenges:

  1. Save a pound a day in a old jar and you’ll have £365 this time next year. Take that £365 and add it to your stocks and shares ISA and pump that money into the stock market to that it can make more money for you.
  2. If you’re about to make a silly purchase such as a 12 slice toaster for £50, don’t buy it, but pretend you’ve spent the money and move that £50 into your stocks and shares ISA. Not only have you saved £50, but you’ve improved the planet by not buying another item that had to be sourced, manufactured, packages and shipped. Win win.
  3. Same above but for taking transport. So if you were going to drive 2 miles to the local shops, jump on your bike or walk. The petrol might be £1. So take that £1, put it in a jar and for all trips you didn’t do, save the money, and at the end of the month add that to your stocks and shares ISA.
  4. Same as above, but now going out for dinner. Rather than paying for a babysitter, a taxi both ways, food and drink; stay in and cook food in the cupboard and have a night playing games. The £50 to £150 you saved, push that straight in the stocks and shares ISA.
  5. Give something up and bank the saving. Do you drink, smoke, have a chocolate bar at 3 pm? Whatever it is. Don’t do it, improve your health and save the money up to the end of the month, then put it in your stocks and shares ISA.
  6. If you buy anything, such as a t-shirt, which costs £15.50, round it up to the next £5 level, so £20. There will be a £4.50 difference which you save up until the end of the month and then add it all to your stocks and shares ISA.
  7. Don’t spend anything all week. What you do is you pick a day in the week to be your starting day. Then the night before you get all the food you need for a week. Then the next day you don’t spend anything, not on food, drink, entertainment, clothes, travel etc. You do that for the entire week. At the end take a portion of the money still in your current account and add it to your stocks and shares ISA.
  8. The doubling challenge. What you do is on the first day of the month you save 1p. Then on the next day you times the amount you saved yesterday by 2, so that will be 2p. The day after you times it by 2 again and that will be 4p. You keep doing that until the amount gets so high that you can’t double it anymore. You then take all that money, add it to your stocks and shares ISA.
  9. This is a drinking game, but can be used for saving. Get a pen and paper and watch the 80s classic The Lost Boys film. In this film Kiefer Sutherland’s character says “Michael” a lot. Make a decision or how much you will save every time he says Michael. It might be £1 or 50p or 20p. Then turn the film on and you put a cross on the paper every time he says Michael. At the end you add the number of crosses up and then multiple them to the amount you allocated for each mention. Example if you said 50p for each Michael, and Kiefer said it 20 times, that would be £10. Once you get the total you immediately move the £10 into your stocks and shares ISA. Be warned, he says Michael an insane amount of times. I reckon the scriptwriter was getting paid by the word.
  10. Lastly this is a health challenge. You reward yourself £5 for every session of fitness you do. So if you go for a run one night you pay yourself £5. If you cycle to work instead of the car you pay yourself £5. If you pull the shed out, clean it, put most things away and throw away any unwanted junk, you pay yourself £5, if you clean the car rather than going to the car wash etc etc. Add all that money up at the end of the month and not only will you be fitter, you’ll be richer and can move that money to your stocks and shares ISA.

Good luck with the challenges and remember to make sure you use the money for your future as soon as the month is over.

Author: The Pound Pence Team

We're Garry and Dave, and we're addicted to talking about money. We want to help as many people as possible become financially free by setting financial goals, getting out of debt, building an emergency fund, saving into their pension, buying their own property and investing for the long term over many decades. We don't do get rich quick, but we do get rich.

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